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Insurance companies hate this one simple tip 16 comments
guest_ · 5 hours ago
The algorithm or literary system etc has theoretical potential but is rife with peril, that I won’t comment on though because you haven’t had the chance to explain your idea so you may have it figured out or be speaking pure theory.
Insurance companies hate this one simple tip 16 comments
guest_ · 5 hours ago
Do we judge a thing on what it is or what it may be? If I steal your laptop, erase it, and sell it, do you owe you the replacement cost of the laptop, or do I owe you $75million your awesome screen play that only existed on the laptop would have made you if I hadn’t stollen your laptop? So the odds are something to be considered by the person making the decision, not in the right to make it.
Insurance companies hate this one simple tip 16 comments
guest_ · 5 hours ago
@bluefrost51- welcome to FunSubstance. We can book the odds of a “reasonable quality of life” for fetus vs whatever- but here’s the question that raises: Are we then saying that the definition of wether murder is a crime is based on the statistical probability of what will most likely happen in the future? So I can pull the plug on a vegetable with a low chance but not a fetus with a high chance based on what it might likely become... so then- can I execute a person who has a high chance of becoming a murderer? Imprison those statistically likely to become criminals?
Every damn time I wash my clothes. I’m throwing your shit away next time 9 comments
guest_ · 6 hours ago
For instance- a roommate equal on the lease, can rearrange the others furniture and belongings within the house as they please so long as they don’t cause damage to those things or remove them from the property. Shared units like condos and apartments with common porch areas that aren’t separated and private, you can also move around items on the porch legally in most places so long as you don’t damage them, remove them from the shared area, or convert them for your use. So 99.9% of the time it’s in your right to move laundry- however it would be nice to speak to the person about it, and unless the clothing is very expensive it’s unlikely even if you do damage or dirty it that the other person would seek legal action- but never forget that person may someday have access to your clothes or car etc. when no one is around and might decide to get “payback.” So manners aren’t just about “being nice,” but about avoiding potentially costly troubles too.
Every damn time I wash my clothes. I’m throwing your shit away next time 9 comments
guest_ · 6 hours ago
The more you touch their stuff the more liability you open yourself up to. Even if you are very careful and do everything right- if something gets damaged or was already worn and handling it causes visible wear you open yourself up to potential legal troubles. It is not illegal in most US states to move laundry if a laundry room is a communal area. The general rule in a nutshell is people with leases covering the same properties, when in an area a landlord grants access to both parties to, have equal rights to the space. It’s still a crime to take their things, sell them, or cause damage (including dirtying clean clothes), but not a crime to move things on the premises if none of those conditions occur.
Every damn time I wash my clothes. I’m throwing your shit away next time 9 comments
guest_ · 6 hours ago
Sharing is as much a skill as an art, it’s about communication as what people consider the “rules” of sharing vary based on many factors and what seems “fair and logical” to you and those who think like you may seem illogical and unfair to others and vice versa. In general if you do remove laundry you should take care with it- place it somewhere clean and put it there neatly. Even if you want to be productive or nice by drying it for them or placing it in the drier- don’t. Not only do people often have their own systems for what goes with what, but some items have special care instructions as well.
Every damn time I wash my clothes. I’m throwing your shit away next time 9 comments
guest_ · 6 hours ago
I’ve got mixed feelings on that one. You never know why the clothes are left there. Let’s say they set a timer and then before it went off they had a personal emergency- someone in the house got hurt, or maybe a sudden case of the poos? It’s certainly messed up to remove their stuff the second it’s done- most etiquette gurus recommend giving it at least 15 minutes after the timer has expired (or after you are aware it has expired.) however it is also rude and irresponsible to not set a timer and get your laundry out in a timely matter. While we should be considerate of others and what they have going on in life- they should also be considerate too. You may have a tight schedule to do your laundry and that extra time may completely ruin your plans.
Truth 10 comments
guest_ · 13 hours ago
The messages are clear. If you aren’t swept off your feet and every moment isn’t exciting and magical: it isn’t real love. If they won’t quit their job or climb a mountain or fight an army for you: it isn’t love. If they don’t enable you and forgive everything you do and think every aspect of you is the most endearing thing ever: it isn’t real love. And of course: if they don’t stick it out through any and all possible scenarios: it isn’t real love. No. Real love is many things to many people- but what we see in media is seldom if ever a realistic depiction of healthy love and relationships, and worse are the examples of “aspirational distinction” where abuse and cruelty and unhealthy traits and behaviors are portrayed as “cool quirks” to be accepted and not serious personal issues they should work on instead f embracing.
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Truth 10 comments
guest_ · 13 hours ago
Well, we’ve been sold on a “Hollywood” love story for generations. These improbable and whirlwind romances, often forged through shared trauma, often set up specifically around everything that we factually know usually is unhealthy and unsustainable in romance. The “long shot” romance is more interesting for the screen but many think what they see is how it should be in real life. We’ve been taught that love is about struggle and fighting and overcoming crazy odds of which the romance is the “trophy” for sticking it out. But the truth is much different usually, and what happens in hours over supposed days or weeks in media is a condensing of months and years and decades of real life moments permitted by regular life and the mundane.
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One ring to rule them all 7 comments
guest_ · 13 hours ago
Hear our cries and answer them Pinterest!!!
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Insurance companies hate this one simple tip 16 comments
guest_ · 13 hours ago
Kudos @malinay. “Life” is a bullshit word. Semen is also alive, are they going to make flushing a load in some toilet paper illegal? Or make it a crime to have a period because every egg is alive and your uterine lining is alive? The 90yo with the failing heart and kidneys is alive and so is the 20yo with the crushed skull who will likely never wake up again... so do you have to pay $4k+ a day to keep them on a machine because they’re “alive” too? Even vegans eat plants that are “alive” and bugs and microorganisms that are “alive.” Try- “sentient” “autonomous,” a bunch f other words that mean more than “alive.” If something doesn’t meet that burden then being alive or not isn’t the primary concern is it?
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From earlier today 47 comments
guest_ · 13 hours ago
So people want to get all technical about when a fetus is or isn’t “alive,” but that same logic would need to apply universally to all life. We cant legislate on “potential” of what something MIGHT become any more than we can arrest a person because it’s likely they will become a criminal. That’s foolish.
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From earlier today 47 comments
guest_ · 13 hours ago
It’s kind of moot anyway what we want to define as “a kid” regardless. Do we pass laws saying that a person MUST keep a relative alive on assisted living, just because there is a heart beat? Or that so long as a heart can beat naturally, a person or hospital must pay to keep a person alive regardless of their brain function or ability to live unassisted? If the issue is the right to life and defending those who ant speak for themselves- surely one would include “vegetative” or “comatose” adults in the same lot? So if you don’t sell your gone and max out your loans to keep your brain dead relative alive you go to jail for murder right? That’s pretty “pro life” isn’t it?
Triggered 10 comments
guest_ · 15 hours ago
Derp. How smert. Green is the opposite of Red, does that mean that if I make an app that changes red to green there are only two colors? The fact that “male” gender is opposite of “female” gender and an app is designed to service those binary genders has nothing to do with how many anything there is. I mean- if an app puts cat heads on dog bodies or dog heads on cat bodies does that mean the only animals are cats and dogs?
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J sayin’ 30 comments
guest_ · 15 hours ago
So yes- rape is one of the most terrible crimes that a human can experience. It can destroy a person or their life, or can scar and change people forever. It undermines trust and the trauma can come back at any time and cause distress and problems in a persons life. It can make us feel weak or helpless and even perhaps overcompensate for that which causes its own issues. But- an ounce of prevention is worth a pound of cure. Addressing social issues of consent and rape, teaching avoidance, funding counseling, aid, and support- building support structures in society and teaching us to look out for each other are better uses of resources and better for society than draconian punishments.
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J sayin’ 30 comments
guest_ · 15 hours ago
We all get to FEEL self righteous and safer and like we have power over crime and over our lives. But statistics show it doesn’t actually work. What’s easiest is seldom what’s best or there wouldn’t be any problems in the world at all because even the laziest person can do something easy. It’s easier to punish than it is to find ways to protect people from wrong while teaching and rehabilitating wrong doers so that they can serve a constructive purpose instead of being a detriment to society. It’s easier to seek vengeance in anger or fear than to feel like you let someone “get away with it” or “get off easy.” We WANT retribution, even when retribution serves little or no good and largely causes more harm than good.
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J sayin’ 30 comments
guest_ · 15 hours ago
It doesn’t pencil out is my point. It cost society and tax payers to try and “punish” people and we get nothing out of it. Maybe a brief feeling for the wronged of vindication that won’t wash away their suffering and struggles or help put their lives back together and make them “whole” again. It’s not constructive. No one really learns anything and everyone loses something. We need better solutions. It’s easier to FEEL like we did something by just passing a law adding time to a crime or requiring public castration or similar punishments..
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J sayin’ 30 comments
guest_ · 15 hours ago
the idea of summary judgment and execution or capital punishment should make anyone think twice on those fronts. Put asides what it says about us to answer a horrendous act against a human with another in kind- but consider what the precedent there is. If you were tried and wrongfully convicted and punished harshly- who do you get “payback” on? The judge? The lawyers? The accuser? The arresting officers? All of them? How do you pay back years in prison, or suffering, or a life of taken? Eye for an eye? Everyone involved in the trial dies too and that sets an example to deter wrongful arrest and conviction and be more careful in the future to others?
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J sayin’ 30 comments
guest_ · 15 hours ago
So it’s a tough one because there is room for error, and the effectiveness of our justice system can’t be judged on how well it punishes wrong doers, but first and foremost on how well it protects and helps recovery of the innocent and the victims, and secondly how well it rehabilitates the guilty. In that light- stricter punishments either pose a serious threat the both the innocent and wrongfully convicted or accused, as well as potentially to the victims themselves, without any evidence and despite all evidence to the contrary that stricter punishments actually have a meaningful impact on crime. That’s not to mention the costs of housing long term prisoners- with the alternatives being some sort of capital punishment which is a HUGE red flag to human rights and the rights of the potentially innocent. So soon on the heels of that old man being killed over false allegations-
2 · Edited 15 hours ago
J sayin’ 30 comments
guest_ · 15 hours ago
... and even if one doesn’t believe that a single moment shouldn’t completely ruin a life but should carry meaningful repercussions- what about wrongful convictions? DNA and other evidence- including victims recanting the testimony as false- decades later. Or prisoners being exonerated after their release. So if we raise the penalty for rape- we certainly need to raise the burden of proof- on a crime that is already hard to prove. Meaning that while those convicted would face harsher punishment, a higher percentage of victims would never get justice as a conviction or even a trial would be less likely in most cases.
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J sayin’ 30 comments
guest_ · 15 hours ago
Increasing punishment rarely if ever serves as a deterrent. People are bad at conceptualizing things like that, and even more so if we are talking “crimes of passion.” Take a 20 year old kid for example- they haven’t been alive 25 years and don’t remember a good chunk of the 20 they were alive nor had a fully formed concept of time for it. So threaten a 25 year sentence and they know it’s “a long time..” but can’t really relate. Rape is very serious. It’s a crime I consider one of if not the lowest crimes that one can commit. The problem is that even rape can be something that a person wouldn’t normally do or would never do again...
2 · Edited 15 hours ago
Women are victims 20 comments
guest_ · 15 hours ago
This comes off as the whining of a person who isn’t actually interested in seeing change happen. Who would try and use the existence of these issues facing men to justify marginalizing or dismissing the valid issues of others- but if faced with personal choice to make changes to abolish unhealthy underlying social norms and thought processes behind these issues and adopt healthy and modern norms for males in society, would scoff at the idea that in order to get a different result you actually have to make changes.
Women are victims 20 comments
guest_ · 15 hours ago
However- we can’t exclusively lay this down as “female privilege.” Especially when we take into account that many so called “privileges” of being female in society are counterbalances or the direct result of oppression of women historically. So yes- men face problems- but there is no reason to blame these problems on women where women are not the cause, and there’s certainly no reason to try and belittle the problems of others simply because we have our own problems. Better even still is if we an empathize and say: “hey- maybe we can help each other solve our problems together...”
Women are victims 20 comments
guest_ · 15 hours ago
Is it privilege that women are more likely to seek a therapist and stick to a regime of medication? Now- certain elements like “asking for help” are put in an unfavorable light in “traditional” ideas of masculinity. This can sometimes stop men from seeking help because they were indoctrinated to not “show vulnerability.” So please note I’m not belittling males and suicide- we do need to help change gender roles so that men know they can get help and can express their emotions.
Women are victims 20 comments
guest_ · 15 hours ago
So there are important questions there. Suicide is another hot button one. It’s been shown in data many times that the overall RISK of suicide and rates of attempt aren’t so far apart between men and women. Men tend to be more successful at it because of the methods that tend to be favored by men and women respectively. Is that a “privilege?” That women tend to choose ineffective suicide methods? What is stopping a man from taking a bunch of sleeping pills in a shared home where he’s likely to be found? What resources are available for women that are not for men to help prevent suicide?